Communication disorders following traumatic brain injury

management of cognitive, language, and motor impairments

Publisher: Pro-Ed in Austin, Tex

Written in English
Published: Pages: 439 Downloads: 52
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Subjects:

  • Brain -- Wounds and injuries -- Complications,
  • Communicative disorders,
  • Brain Injury -- complications,
  • Communicative Disorders -- etiology,
  • Deglutition Disorders -- etiology

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Statementedited by David R. Beukelman, Kathryn M. Yorkston.
ContributionsBeukelman, David R., 1943-, Yorkston, Kathryn M., 1948-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsRD594 .C65 1990
The Physical Object
Paginationxi, 439 p. :
Number of Pages439
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2195086M
ISBN 10089079295X
LC Control Number89014560

1. Communication problems following traumatic brain injury / Leanne Togher, Skye McDonald and Chris Code 2. The nature of traumatic brain injury: Basic features and neuropsychological consequences / Skye McDonald, Leanne Togher and Chris Code 3. Discourse analysis in traumatic brain injury / . Acquired brain injury Any type of brain damage occurring after birth (e.g., traumatic brain injury, stroke, tumour) Apraxia of speech A motor speech disorder that impairs the ability to voluntarily move and sequence speech movements (also known as dyspraxia) Articulation Ability to produce speech sounds using the articulators (e.g., tongue. viii Cognitive Rehabilitation theRapy foR tRaumatiC bRain injuRy (Chapter 8: Memory), a chapter on defi-cits in the area of executive function and awareness (Chapter 9: Executive Function and Awareness), and a chapter devoted spe-cifically to social communication (Chapter Social Communication). The format. Toward this goal I am interested in better understanding how cognitive deficits translate into communication disorders after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and how communication outcomes may change across the lifespan. Professional Societies. American .

  A cognitive disorder is when your brain does not work correctly after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). A TBI often damages the front part of your brain, which is the part of the brain used for thinking and memory. You may have difficulty doing the same things that you did before the TBI. What are the symptoms of a cognitive disorder? INTRODUCTION. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a steadily rising public health concern and one of the significant causes of morbidity and mortality in India.[] Around 10 million people sustain TBI worldwide annually.[] The recent global status report on road safety by the World Health Organization, has clearly highlighted the existing and growing enormity of this problem across the world.

Communication disorders following traumatic brain injury Download PDF EPUB FB2

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) constitutes a public health problem of great significance with importance in both morbidity and mortality, accounting for approximately 15 to 20% of deaths in people between five and 35 years of age and responsible for 1% of all adult deaths.[]In the United States, about 59 million people every year die following : Edilene Curvelo Hora, Liane Viana Santana, Gizelle de Oliveira Souza Lyvia de Jesus Santos, Analys V.

There are very few books available which are concerned with the unique communication problems that can come with traumatic brain injury (TBI). In recent years there has emerged a realisation that these difficulties in communication are closely tied to the cognitive, behavioural and social problems observed following traumatic brain injury.

This is changing the way people with TBI are assessed. Leanne Togher is Professor of Communication Disorders following Traumatic Brain Injury, Senior Research Fellow of the National Health and Medical Research Council and Principal Research Fellow of the University of Sydney.

Togher is widely known for her work characterizing discourse and communication disorders post-TBI. Leanne Togher is Professor of Communication Disorders following Traumatic Brain Injury, Senior Research Fellow of the National Health and Medical Research Council and Principal Research Fellow of the University of Sydney.

Togher is widely known for her work characterizing discourse and communication disorders post-TBI/5(2). Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can seriously disrupt the social and communication skills that are basic requirements for everyday life.

It is the loss of these interpersonal skills that can be the most devastating for people with TBI and their families. Although there are many books that focus upon TBI, none focus on communication and communication skills specifically. Cognitive and communication problems that result from traumatic brain injury Communication disorders following traumatic brain injury book from person to person.

These problems depend on many factors which include an individual's personality, preinjury abilities, and the severity of the brain damage. The effects of the brain damage are generally greatest immediately following the injury. 'Overall, the book provides a thought provoking comprehensive overview of communication disorders following Traumatic Brain Injury, and will be of interest to Speech and Language Therapists, Psychologists and others working in this area.' - C.

Keohane, British Journal of Neurosurgery. There are very few books available which are concerned with the unique communication problems that can come with traumatic brain injury (TBI).

In recent years there has emerged a realisation that these difficulties in communication are closely tied to the cognitive, behavioural and social problems observed following traumatic brain by: ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xiv, pages ; 24 cm.

Contents: 1. Communication problems following traumatic brain injury / Leanne Togher, Skye McDonald and Chris Code The nature of traumatic brain injury: Basic features and neuropsychological consequences / Skye McDonald, Leanne Togher and Chris Code Discourse analysis in traumatic.

1. Social and Communication disorders following traumatic brain injury Leanne Togher, Skye McDonald and Chris Code 2: Traumatic Brain Injury: Basic Features Skye McDonald, Leanne Togher, and Chris Code 3. The nature of cognitive deficits and psychosocial function following TBI Skye McDonald, Leanne Togher, and Chris Code 4.

Get this from a library. Social and communication disorders following traumatic brain injury. [Skye McDonald; Leanne Togher; Christopher Code;] -- Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can seriously disrupt the social and communication skills that are basic requirements for everyday life.

It is the loss of these interpersonal skills that can be the most. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can seriously disrupt the social and communication skills that are basic requirements for everyday life. It is the loss of these interpersonal skills that can be the most devastating for people with TBI and their by:   Buy Communication Disorders Following Traumatic Brain Injury (Brain, Behaviour and Cognition) 1 by McDonald, Skye (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Paperback. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can seriously disrupt the social and communication skills that are basic requirements for everyday life. It is the loss of these interpersonal skills that can be the most devastating for people with TBI and their : Taylor And Francis.

Prominent issues influencing our appreciation of cognitive-communication disorders are elaborated. These are issues with terminology, assessment (including the role of supporting cognitive processes), and the sociocultural context of the individual with cognitive-communication disorders following traumatic brain injury (TBI).Cited by: cognitive communication following TBI and developmental language impairment Manager of the Paediatric Brain Injury Rehabilitation Team for 7 years, Speech Pathologist on the Paediatric Brain Injury Rehabilitation Team >10 years Guideline development: Nil Consultancy: Provide consultancy services for.

Some causes of communication problems include hearing loss, neurological disorders, brain injury, vocal cord injury, autism, intellectual disability, drug abuse, physical impairments such as cleft.

Traumatic brain injury, or TBI, causes damage to the brain that can result in speech, language, thinking, and swallowing problems. TBI can happen at any age.

Speech-language pathologists, or SLPs, can help. Visit ASHA ProFind to locate a professional in your area. TBI is a brain injury that can happen from a bump or blow to the head or when an.

Aphasia commonly occurs following a stroke but can occur following traumatic brain injury, brain tumors or an anoxic episode (lack of oxygen to the brain). Depending on the area of the brain affected, people may experience expressive or receptive aphasia, or a combination of both.

Traumatic brain injury, characterized by A or B: A. Disorganization of motor function in two extremities (see D1), resulting in an extreme limitation (see D2) in the ability to stand up from a seated position, balance while standing or walking, or use the upper extremities, persisting for at least 3 consecutive months after.

Signs and symptoms of TBI vary, depending on the site and extent of injury to the brain, the age at which the injury occurred, premorbid abilities, and functional domains affected (e.g., physical, cognitive, language, sensory). The effects of TBI can be temporary or permanent, and no two children present with the same pattern.

See our TBI Home Page for a full list of information about Brain Injury, and links to information and strategies relating to memory, attention, social skills, executive functioning, and improving communication. It is common to have memory problems following brain injury.

When we hear, see and remember information, the memory process completes several processes, and difficulties may occur. This chapter provides an overview of the main themes in the research into pragmatic disruption in people with aphasia, right hemisphere language disorder, schizophrenia, traumatic brain injury.

A traumatic brain injury can cause damage to the brain that may contribute to both short term and long term difficulties with communication and cognitive functioning. An injury of this kind can occur both from the impact of an external force or an internal event such as a stroke, tumour or disease.

Cognitive Communication Disorders Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Practical Guide was written by Bernard Wiseman, Carol Hayter, Carol Neary, Freund, Jane Freund, and Sheila Macdonald.

Cognitive Communication Disorders Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Practical Guide was published by Communication Skill Builders/Therapy Skill Bu. It may be developmental or acquired. Individuals may demonstrate one or any combination of communication disorders.

It may result in a primary disability or it may be secondary to other disabilities. traumatic brain injury genetic disorders lack of oxygen to the brain (anoxia) Holding a book. BRIEF CONTENTS Preface xiii Contributors xv Reviewers xvi Features of this Text xix CHAPTER 1 Introduction 3 CHAPTER 2 Basic Brain Anatomy 19 CHAPTER 3 Acute Etiologies of Neurogenic Communication Disorders 67 CHAPTER 4 The Aphasias 93 CHAPTER 5 Right Hemisphere Disorders CHAPTER 6 Motor Speech Disorders: Apraxia of Speech and Evaluation of Motor Speech File Size: 1MB.

Communication problems after brain injury. Communication problems after brain injury are very common. Although most of us take it for granted, the ability to communicate requires extremely complex skills and many different parts of the brain are involved.

There are four main categories of the effects of brain injury. Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in aphasic disturbances in a minority and impaired communication competence in many more.

Different assessment approaches have revealed problems in maintaining coherence across extended discourse, difficulties in the production and comprehension of conversational inference, and clumsy participation in conversation, including poor topic maintenance Cited by: Stroke is just one cause.

A cognitive-communication disorder can also result from a traumatic brain injury, a brain infection, a brain tumor, or a degenerative disease such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, or some other form of dementia.

Psychiatric Disorders Following Traumatic Brain Injury Article in The Journal of head trauma rehabilitation 24(5) September with Reads How we measure 'reads'.Traumatic brain injury (TBI) constitutes a public health problem of great significance with importance in both morbidity and mortality, accounting for approximately 15 to 20% of deaths in people between five and 35 years of age and responsible for 1% of all adult deaths.[] In the United States, about 59 million people every year die following TBI.Lippincott Journals Subscribers, use your username or email along with your password to log in.